GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

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NOAA GFDL Climate Research Highlights Image Gallery

Patterns of Greenhouse Warming

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CONTENTS
2-D Graphics & Maps
Animations & Movies


Contacts:

  • GFDL scientist contacts for this topic:
    Thomas Delworth, NOAA/GFDL
    Ronald Stouffer, NOAA/GFDL
    Michael Winton, NOAA/GFDL
  • GFDL Communications Officer: Maria Setzer, NOAA/GFDL
  • Animations and graphics developed by: Keith Dixon , NOAA/GFDL

Contact information (email, phone numbers) can be found for these people by entering their names into the NOAA Staff Directory.

The materials presented here help illustrate some of the key research results that GFDL scientists have reported on recently. These graphics are considered to be in the public domain, and thus can be downloaded freely. We do request that if these images are used in publications or media broadcasts credit be given to "NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory" or at least "NOAA GFDL".

 2-D Graphics and Maps
[Global Warming Map]

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Figure caption: Projected change in annual mean surface air temperature from the late 20th century (1971-2000 average) to the middle 21st century (2051-2060 average). The change is in response to increasing greenhouse gases and aerosols based on a "middle of the road" estimate of future emissions. This scenario is denoted as IPCC SRES A1B. Warming is larger over continents than oceans, and is largest at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. These results are from the GFDL CM2.1 model, but are consistent with a broad consensus of modeling results.


[Global Warming figure GFDL CM2.1]

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Figure caption: Same as for picture with black background above


[Global Warming - seasons JJA DJF from GFDL CM2.1 cliamte model]

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Figure caption: GFDL CM2.1 model-simulated change in seasonal mean surface air temperature from the late 20th century (1971-2000 average) to the middle 21st century (2051-2060). The left panel shows changes for June July August (JJA) seasonal averages, and the right panel shows changes for December January February (DJF). The simulated surface air temperature changes are in response to increasing greenhouse gases and aerosols based on a "middle of the road" estimate of future emissions This scenario is denoted as IPCC SRES A1B . Warming is projected to be larger over continents than oceans, and is largest at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere during Northern Hemisphere winter (DJF).


[Global Warming figure GFDL CM2.1]

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Figure caption: Same as for picture with black background above.

 

 Animations and Movies
[Global Warming animation frame snapshot - year 2065]

Animations of the type indicated by the picture above are available in two different sizes.
Select an icon below to access the animation described to its right. We provide multiple versions of this animation, including versions using the mpg-4 format (well-suited for Windows Media Player viewing) and others in .mov format that is well-suited for viewing with QuickTime player. (Clicking the picture above will direct you to the smallest animation in .mov format.)

[quicktime icon] 720 x480 resolution, 30 fps .mov format 1971-2100, 1305 frames total, 43.3 seconds at 30 fps [13MB]

[windows media icon] 720 x480 resolution, 30 fps mpg-4 format 1971-2100, 1305 frames total, 43.3 seconds at 30 fps [12MB]

[quicktime icon] 1280 x720 resolution, 30 fps .mov format 1971-2100, 1305 frames total, 43.3 seconds at 30 fps [27MB]

[windows media icon] 1280 x 720 resolution, 30 fps mpg-4 format 1971-2100, 1305 frames total, 43.3 seconds at 30 fps [17MB]

animation description
This animation depicts the time evolution of annual mean surface air temperature changes as projected by the NOAA GFDL CM2.1 climate model. The animations show the time period 1970 to 2100. For each time level shown, the temperature differences (or anomalies) were calculated by subtracting the model-simulated average for the years 1971 to 2000 from the time varying 21st century model-projected temperatures. The changes depicted in the animation are in response to increasing greenhouse gases and aerosols based on a "middle of the road" estimate of future emissions. This scenario is denoted as IPCC SRES A1B.
These animations were produced using the output of the CM2.1 "H2" historical experiment for the 20th century time period and the CM2.1 SRES A1B run for the 2001-2100 period.