GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

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Shannon Rees

Email:  Shannon.Rees@noaa.gov

I am a programming scientist at GFDL’s Weather and Climate Dynamics group.  I am employed through UCAR and work with the FV3 Dynamical Core group.  I have supported the High Impact Weather Prediction Project (HIWPP) and the Next Generation Global Prediction System (NGGPS) projects, by managing the pre-processing tools and initial condition datasets for the fvGFS model, evaluating forecasts with the DTC Model Evaluation Tools, and creating visualizations for websites and presentations.

 

Education

In August 2014 I graduated from University of Hawaii at Manoa with my M.S. in Meteorology.  My adviser was Dr. Michael Bell and my thesis research focused on estimating supergradient winds (SGW) in the primary and secondary eyewalls of Hurricane Rita (2005).  SGW are suspected by some to be associated with hurricane intensification.  Using both a WRF simulation and real airborne observations from Rita (synthesized using SAMURAI) I investigated the evolution of SGW, during an eyewall replacement cycle.  I found SGW estimates that are comparable in magnitude to other similar studies.  To find out how accurate this estimate was, I took synthetic observation of the WRF model output and compared this to the actual model output fields. Using SAMURAI, I was able to achieve low errors for wind retrievals, though pressure gradient errors were less impressive.  This research is ongoing.

In May 2012 I graduated from University of Delaware with my B.S. in Environmental Science (Concentration in Atmospheric Science and Minor in Geography).  While there, I did research on the historical evapotranspiration of the White Clay Creek Watershed.  I also contributed to the Coastal Storm Climatology of Delaware and a paper (still in the works) on the hurricane climatology of the Mid-Atlantic.

Presentations and Seminars

  1. Shannon L. Rees, S.-J. Lin, J.-H. Chen, R. Benson, X. Chen, L. Harris, Z. Liang, L. Zhou: FV3 and the Next Generation Global Prediction System. 32nd Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, San Juan, PR, 17 – 22 April.
  2. Rees, S. L.: An Introduction to Esri’s ArcGIS, Princeton, NJ, December 17, 2014.  You can access the presentation here.
  3. McElhinney, S. L. and M. M. Bell, 2013: Observations of Supergradient Winds in the Tropical Cyclone Boundary Layer. 31st Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology,
    San Diego, CA, 21 March – 4 April.
  4. McElhinney, S. L. and M. M. Bell, 2013: Observations of Low-level Supergradient Winds in
    Hurricane Rita. University of Hawai’i Meteorology Department Seminar, Honolulu, HI, 12 March.
  5. McElhinney, S. L. and M. M. Bell, 2014: Observations of Supergradient Winds in the Tropical Cyclone Boundary Layer. Workshop on Tropical Dynamics and the MJO, Honolulu, HI, 14 – 16 January.
  6. McElhinney, S. L. and M. M. Bell, 2013: Improved tropical cyclone boundary layer
    wind retrievals using airborne Doppler radar. 36th Conference on Radar Meteorology,
    Breckenridge, CO, 16 – 20 September.

Publications

  1. Bell M. M., R. Ballard, M. Bauman, A. Foerster, A. Frambach, K. Kosiba, W-C. Lee, S. L. McElhinney, J. Wurman, The Hawaiian Education Radar Opportunity. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
  2. McElhinney, S. L., 2014: Observations of Supergradient Winds in the Tropical Cyclone Boundary Layer. M.S. thesis, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa, 73 pp.
  3. Leathers, D. J., D. R. Legates, and R. Scarborough, March 15, 2011: Delaware Coastal Storm Climatology and Damage Assessment 1871-2009, Final Report. Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Figure 3.1. pp. 20.

Future Publications

  1. Rees, S. L., and M. M. Bell, Observations of Supergradient Winds in the Tropical Cyclone Boundary Layer. Mon. Wea. Rev.
  2. Leathers, D. J., B. Stout, and S. L. Rees, A Climatology of Tropical Weather Systems Affecting he Mid-Atlantic Region of North America and Associated Hazards. International Journal of Climatology.