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GFDL Events & Seminars

Poster Expos

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars
  • April 29, 2015: Get more from your data with PyFerret
    Karl Smith (NOAA/PMEL (Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory))
    Present an introduction and discussion of PyFerret, the new Python-enabled version of Ferret.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 30, 2015: Uncertainty in climate change projections: the role of internal atmospheric circulation variability
    Clara Deser (NCAR)
    This talk will highlight the relative importance of internally-generated vs. externally-forced climate trends at local and regional scales over North America and Eurasia based on a 30-member ensemble of the Community Earth System Model over the period 1920-2100. Each member is subject to the same historical and future (RCP8.5) radiative forcing scenario, but starts from a slightly different atmospheric state. Unpredictable, intrinsic variability of the large-scale atmospheric circulation strongly influences the pattern, magnitude and polarity of surface air temperature and precipitation trends in any single simulation, despite the common radioactive forcing. Implications for model validation, inter-model comparisons, and interpretation of observed climate trends will be discussed.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 6, 2015: TBA
    Pu Lin (AOS/GFDL)
    TBA
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 7, 2015: Local and remote climate response to aerosol forcing
    Jean-Francois Lamarque (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado)
    This talk aims at addressing the following question: what are the local and remote impacts of regional perturbations in aerosol emissions, as these could be key drivers of regional climate changes over the next several decades? More specifically, using results from chemistry-climate simulations, we will discuss the climate (mostly temperature and precipitations) response to regional perturbations in present-day aerosol (or their precursors) emissions. In another set of experiments and analysis, we will juxtapose the climate response to greenhouse-gas forcing and to aerosol forcing, including extremes. By using large ensembles, we are able to extract the forced response from the noise associated with internal variability.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 14, 2015: Impacts of Rossby Wave Breaking on Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity
    Zhou Wang (U of Illinois)
    TBA
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 20, 2015: Local and remote climate effects of regional aerosol emissions
    Apostolos Voulgarakis (Imperial College)
    The radiative forcing of short-lived pollutants such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone is highly inhomogeneous and can therefore affect regional temperature, circulation and precipitation in a much more complicated way than the forcing of well-mixed greenhouse gases. However, such effects have not been examined thoroughly and systematically from a global point of view, to understand regional interactions. Here, after outlining some key past work in this area, results from recent simulations with the HadGEM3 global composition-climate model will be presented in which anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and black carbon in key regions (East Asia, South Asia, the US, and the northern mid-latitudes as a whole) have been removed. The linkages between emissions, concentrations, radiative forcing, temperature and precipitation response will be discussed. A particular emphasis will be placed on non-local effects, i.e. how emissions over a certain region can affect other areas remotely. Finally, we will contrast our results with those from similar experiments pursued using the GISS-E2 and the CESM1 models for US and East Asian SO2 emissions, and will discuss the large differences in the models' behaviour.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 21, 2015: TBA
    Steve Krueger (University of Utah)
    TBA
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 10, 2015: NOAA Public Access to Research Results: A discussion of changing NOAA Requirements
    Ronald Stouffer
    NOAA Public Access to Research Results: A discussion of changing NOAA Requirements
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 17, 2015: Anthropogenic climate change drives shift and shuffle in marine phytoplankton communities
    Andrew Barton ((GFDL/CICS))
    Anthropogenic climate change drives shift and shuffle in marine phytoplankton communities
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 18, 2015: TBA
    Susan Lozier (Duke University)
    TBA
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 25, 2015: TBA
    Richard Rotunno (UCAR, Boulder, CO)
    TBA
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 8, 2015: TBA
    Tom Delworth and Liping Zhang (GFDL)
    TBA
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 29, 2015: TBA
    Dr. Paul Spence (UNSW, Sydney, Australia)
    Meeting
    Time: 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 2, 2015: Analytical solution of PBL
    Ben-Jei Tsuang (GFDL)
    Seminar
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 8, 2015: TBA
    Amy Clement (RSMAS - Miami)
    TBA
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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