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GFDL Events & Seminars

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars
  • June 1, 2016: Ice shelf melting and breaking: implications for Antarctic Climate
    Alon Stern (GFDL)
    The freshwater flux from the Antarctic continent into the global ocean occurs through basal melting and the calving of icebergs off the edge of Antarctic ice shelves. The meltwater from basal melting affects local hydrography and plays a role in driving local ocean currents around Antarctica. In contrast, icebergs can drift long distances from their calving origins before melting entirely, depositing their meltwater remotely and affecting sea ice formation and climate away from the Antarctic coastline. This talk focuses on the mechanisms (and ocean currents) that move heat and freshwater towards and away from the Antarctic ice shelves. These heat delivery mechanisms are discussed using a combination of laboratory experiments, analysis of field observations, and both complex and simple numerical models. With these mechanisms in mind, a fully-coupled general circulation model with an iceberg component is used to investigate how the partitioning of the Antarctic freshwater flux into basal melting and iceberg calving affects the greater climate system. Finally, we discuss some new ideas and innovations for iceberg and ice shelf modeling, which are a step towards creating a unified ice modeling framework.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 2, 2016: TBD
    Alessandra Giannini (International Research Institute for Climate and Society, Columbia University)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 3, 2016: Stationary-eddy influence on changes in the hydrological cycle
    Dr. Robert Wills (ETH Zurich)
    The "wet gets wetter, dry gets drier" paradigm explains the expected moistening of the extratropics and drying of the subtropics as the atmospheric moisture content increases with global warming. Here, we show, using precipitation minus evaporation (P - E) data from climate models, that it cannot be extended to apply regionally to deviations from the zonal mean. Wet and dry zones shift substantially in response to shifts in the stationary-eddy circulations that cause them. Additionally, atmospheric circulation changes lead to a smaller increase in the zonal variance of P - E than would be expected from atmospheric moistening alone. The P - E variance change can be split into dynamic and thermodynamic components through an analysis of the atmospheric moisture budget. This reveals that a weakening of stationary-eddy circulations and changes in the zonal variation of transient-eddy moisture fluxes moderate the strengthening of the zonally anomalous hydrological cycle with global warming. In order to understand the mechanisms for these changes in stationary-eddy circulations, we examine the climate change response of stationary eddies in idealized GCM experiments with simple zonal asymmetries: a midlatitude Gaussian mountain and a zonally anomalous ocean heating pattern in the tropics. Through an analysis of the atmospheric energy budget in these experiments, we explain the different mechanisms responsible for their responses to global warming. Through this work we lay out a framework for understanding changes in the zonally anomalous hydrological cycle in terms of changes in zonal-mean climate.
    Time: 10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 6, 2016: Ron Stouffer Symposium
    Ron Stouffer Symposium
    For the past 38 years, Ron Stouffer's comprehensive research contributions at GFDL have expanded scientific understanding of the atmosphere, oceans, and climate through high performance supercomputing with mathematical models of the Earth system. Ron's accomplishments include the development, along with Suki Manabe, of the first coupled atmosphere-ocean models for global climate warming projections, new understanding of natural modes of climate variability, palecolimate, atmosphere and ocean responses to natural and human-influenced factors, and ongoing leadership of both model development within GFDL and community synthesis efforts through the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. To commemorate Ron Stouffer's illustrious career, we are in the early planning stage to hold a one day Symposium at GFDL. We are planning three forward-looking science sessions focusing on topics on which Ron's career has had demonstrable impact. The morning session will foucs on scientific talks relating to climate change and community assessments therof, followed by a panel discussion on the increasing overlap between climate modeling and impact assessments and to what extent can they be merged. The afternoon session will include a range of climate-related talks on regional patterns, variability, sea level rise, the carbon system and other topics on which Ron has demonstrated scientific leadership. For more information click here
    Time: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 7, 2016: TBD
    Daniel Rothenberg (MIT)
    TBD
    Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 8, 2016: Lunch Time Seminar Series
    Baird Langenbrunner (UCLA)
    Lunch Time Seminar Series
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 10, 2016: The impact of extra-tropical oceans on climate: warm and cold paths
    Arnaud Czaja (Imperial College, London, UK)
    The variability displayed by satellite estimates of surface currents and that of temperature and salinity fields in the Argo data over the recent decade is fascinating. The extra-tropical oceans in particular draw attention with respect to anthropogenic heat uptake and lateral exchange of heat between mid and high latitudes. But are the climate models able to represent the impact of these oceanic changes on weather patterns and on the low frequency variability of storm-tracks? Or are there none? In this talk, I will suggest that an important mechanism of interaction between the extra-tropical oceans and the atmosphere is missing in coarse coupled climate models. The mechanism relies on the impact of warm water advection by western boundary currents on the warm sector of atmospheric cyclones. The mechanism will be highlighted by high resolution (12km) simulations with the Met Office UM model and reanalyses data. It will also be compared to more traditional mechanisms of oceanic forcing associated with shallow, low level, diabatic heating in the cold sector of atmospheric cyclones.
    Time: 10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 15, 2016: TBD
    Louise Nuijens (MIT)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 16, 2016: The ECMWF coupled data assimilation system for climate reanalysis Authors: Roberto Buizza and Patrick Laloyaux Affiliation: European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)
    Roberto Buizza (ECMWF, Reading UK)
    The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) has developed a coupled variational assimilation system that ingests simultaneously ocean and atmospheric observations. In this variational system, which has been named CERA, full coupling of the ocean and atmosphere components is achieved at the outer-loop level. Employing the coupled model constraint in the variational method implies that assimilation of an ocean observation has immediate impact on the atmospheric state estimate, and, conversely, assimilation of an atmospheric observation affects the ocean state. Within the European Union FP7 project ERA-CLIM2, this coupled approach has been applied to produce the first coupled global reanalysis of the 20th-century (CERA-20C), which will provide a century-long record of low-frequency climate variability and change using a consistent set of observations. The evolution of the global ocean and atmosphere for the period 1901–2010 is represented by a ten-member ensemble of 3-hourly estimates for ocean, surface and upper-air parameters. The ensemble technique has been used to take into account inevitable uncertainties in the observational record and the forecast model, and provides an indication of the data confidence. In this talk, the ECMWF activities in reanalysis will be briefly reviewed, the CERA system will be described, and some preliminary results from the CERA-20C reanalysis, which is expected to be completed by the end of May, will be presented.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 17, 2016: TBD
    Jordan Schnell (University of California, Irvine)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 21, 2016: Junyi Chai Final Public Oral
    Junyi Chai Final Public Oral
    Junyi Chai Final Public Oral
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 22, 2016: TBD
    Tra Dinh (Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 23, 2016: TBD
    Dr. Lundquist
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 12, 2016: Jeff Strong Final Oral Presentation
    Jeff Strong Final Oral Presentation
    Jeff Strong Final Oral Presentation
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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