GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

Skip to main content

GFDL Events & Seminars

Poster Expos

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars
  • August 5, 2015: Deciphering the Climate of Noachian Mars through 3D Climate Modeling
    Robin Wordsworth (Harvard University)
    The early Martian climate is a long-standing problem in planetary science. Evidence for flowing liquid water on the surface 3-4 Ga is conclusive, but Mars' orbital distance the faintness of the young Sun make warming the early climate exceedingly difficult. Various solutions have been proposed over the years, but most previous modelling of early Mars has been limited to simple 1D climate models. Here I describe recent 3D climate simulations with realistic radiative transfer that have shed new light on this problem. In particular, I show how careful comparison between simulation results and the geologic evidence allows us to distinguish "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios for the early climate. I also discuss the implications of the results for the history of Gale crater and the probability of ancient Martian life.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 6, 2015: The Next HyperThermal
    Matthew Huber (University of New Hampshire)
    "Given the nature of the subject we must remind ourselves that it is simply not possible to construct a model…that can serve as a scaffolding on which….[we] can rely on support at all times…. No matter how versatile the code, the situation will always lead to the consequences we have already alluded to:…. theory conflicts with practice.” From Clausewitz, (On War, Paret Translation 1989) After some discussion of the history and application of models in greenhouse paleoclimate contexts, I step through a set of case studies in paleoclimate from Eocene through Miocene in which I assess the ability of models to capture the essence of paleoclimate proxy data interpretations. I present results on both greenhouse gas and non-greenhouse gas climate forcings and discuss some of the opportunities and pitfalls associated focusing only on one or the other potential type of forcing. Along the way, I will cover the topics such as how tectonics and ice sheets affect climate, the stability of the tropical ocean atmosphere circulation structure, the conceptual underpinnings of climate sensitivity, and the ability of models to inform interpretations of paleoclimate information and vice versa. Finally, implications are drawn for the future with an emphasis on heat stress.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 7, 2015: Contrasting the Hydrological Cycle in Past and Future Warm Climates - with implications for Ocean Overturning Circulation
    Natalie Burls (George Mason University)
    The Pliocene Epoch, ~3-5 million years ago, is a particularly interesting period in Earth’s history. With a continental configuration similar to present-day, it is the most recent period during which atmospheric CO2 levels are estimated to have been as high as today’s anthropogenically-forced levels. SST reconstructions from locations around the globe reveal that the Pliocene was characterized by weak meridional and zonal gradients. This talk briefly reviews the available data together with theory and sensitivity experiments suggesting that changes in cloud radiative forcing played a crucial role in maintaining weak Pliocene gradients. These weak gradients have important implications for the hydrological cycle as illustrated by contrasting a typical quadrupling-of-CO2 experiment against a simulation in which modified cloud properties maintain reduced Pliocene-like SST gradients. Supporting weaker atmospheric circulation, the Pliocene-like simulation is more consistent with reconstructions of Pliocene vegetation suggesting that subtropical regions had enough precipitation to support rich vegetation and fauna. Only with global cooling and the onset of glacial cycles some 3 million years ago did the broad pattern of arid and semi-arid subtropical regions become fully established. Moreover, the associated changes in ocean freshwater forcing give rise to North Pacific deep-water formation and meridional overturning in the Pliocene-like experiment - a result in consistent with calcium carbonate accumulation rates in the subarctic North Pacific.
    Time: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 26, 2015: The History of Computer Users Advisory Board (CUAB) at GFDL
    Ron Stouffer
    History of CUAB By Ronald J Stouffer The Computer Users Advisory Board (CUAB) was formed on October 20, 1976 by the GFDL Director, Dr. Joseph Smagorinsky. Its charge was to help enhance the utility of the computer facility at GFDL. Functionally CUAB acts as a focal point for user concerns and problems with the computing environment. CUAB helps communicate those issues to people in the Systems Group and to the Front Office (the Director and Deputy Director). This talk will review CUAB’s history and outlook for the future. There will also be a discussion time with the two founding members of CUAB.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 9, 2015: Roles of Climate Variability on Western US Ozone Pollution: Decadal Changes, Extremes, and Implications for Seasonal Prediction
    Meiyun Lin (NOAA/GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 16, 2015: How does the deep ocean manage to achieve upwelling, and on the thermodynamics of seawater and frazil ice
    Trevor McDougall (University of New South Wales, Sydney, AUS)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 17, 2015: TBD
    Lantau Sun (NOAA CIRES Univeristy of Colorado/ESRL)
    TBD
    Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 23, 2015: TBD
    Gustavo Marques (GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 24, 2015: What Has Caused the Global Warming Hiatus Since Year 2000?
    Aiguo Dai ( University at Albany)
    Despite a steady increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), global-mean surface temperature (T) has shown no discernible warming since about 2000, in sharp contrast to model simulations, which on average project strong warming. The recent slowdown in observed surface warming has been attributed to decadal cooling in the tropical Pacific, intensifying trade winds, changes in El Niño activity, increasing volcanic activity and decreasing solar irradiance. Earlier periods of arrested warming have been observed but received much less attention than the recent period, and their causes are poorly understood. Here we analyze observed and model-simulated global T fields to quantify the contributions of internal climate variability (ICV) to decadal changes in global-mean T since 1920. We show that the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has been associated with large T anomalies over both ocean and land. Combined with another leading mode of ICV, the IPO explains most of the difference between observed and model-simulated rates of decadal change in global-mean T since 1920, and particularly over the so-called ‘hiatus’ period since about2000. We conclude that ICV, mainly through the IPO, was largely responsible for the recent slowdown, as well as for earlier slowdowns and accelerations in global-mean T since 1920, with preferred spatial patterns different from those associated with GHG-induced warming or aerosol-induced cooling. Recent history suggests that the IPO could reverse course and lead to accelerated global warming in the coming decades.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 30, 2015: TBD
    Vaishali Naik (NOAA/GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 1, 2015: TBD
    Yi Deng (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 7, 2015: Analytical solution of PBL
    Ben-Jei Tsuang (NOAA)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 8, 2015: TBD
    Amy Clement (RSMAS - Miami)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 22, 2015: TBD
    Mary-Louise Timmermans (Yale University)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 18, 2015: TBD
    Lorenzo Polvani (Columbia University)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 19, 2015: TBD
    Marty Singh (Harvard University)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • December 3, 2015: TBD
    Jadwig Richter (NCAR, Boulder CO)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 21, 2016: TBD
    Ed Gerber (NYU)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

Click here to subscribe to our RSS feed