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GFDL Events & Seminars

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars
  • June 29, 2016: Origins of model diversity
    V. Balaji
    In this talk, I will cover sources of diversity in climate models. We will look at the process of model development at different institutions and show how many factors: including history and culture, scientific priorities, community of users, developers and "customers", and computational constraints, play a role in defining a climate model. We will explore how this may evolve in the future.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 6, 2016: Processes regulating formation of low-salinity high-phytoplankton biomass lenses near the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf
    Yizhen Li (Woods Hole Oceanographic)
    Both remotely sensed and in situ observations in austral summer of early 2012 in the Ross Sea suggest the presence of cold, low-salinity, and high-biomass eddies along the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS). Satellite measurements include sea surface temperature and ocean color, and shipboard data sets include hydrographic profiles, towed instrumentation, and underway acoustic Doppler current profilers. Idealized model simulations are utilized to examine the processes responsible for ice shelf eddy formation. 3-D model simulations produce similar cold and fresh eddies, although the simulated vertical lenses are quantitatively thinner than observed. Model sensitivity tests show that both basal melting underneath the ice shelf and irregularity of the ice shelf edge facilitate generation of cold and fresh eddies. 2-D model simulations further suggest that both basal melting and downwelling-favorable winds play crucial roles in forming a thick layer of low-salinity water observed along the edge of the RIS. These properties may have been entrained into the observed eddies, whereas that entrainment process was not captured in the specific eddy formation events studied in our 3-D model—which may explain the discrepancy between the simulated and observed eddies, at least in part. Additional sensitivity experiments imply that uncertainties associated with background stratification and wind stress may also explain why the model underestimates the thickness of the low-salinity lens in the eddy interiors. Our study highlights the importance of incorporating accurate wind forcing, basal melting, and ice shelf irregularity for simulating eddy formation near the RIS edge. The processes responsible for generating the high phytoplankton biomass inside these eddies remain to be elucidated.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 11, 2016: TBD
    Amanda O'Rourke
    TBD
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: 309 Seminar Room
  • August 2, 2016: Spencer Hill Final Public Oral
    Spencer Hill Final Public Oral
    Spencer Hill Final Public Oral
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 12, 2016: Jeff Strong Final Oral Presentation
    Jeff Strong Final Oral Presentation
    Jeff Strong Final Oral Presentation
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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