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GFDL Events

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars
  • April 24, 2014: Explaining the continuum of Dansgaard Oeschger variability
    Axel Timmermann (U of Hawaii)
    Explaining the continuum of Dansgaard Oeschger variability
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 28, 2014: Phase speed of ocean eddy fluxes in the Pacific
    Ryan Abernathy (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, NY)
    Phase speed of ocean eddy fluxes in the Pacific
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 29, 2014: TBA
    Claudia Tebaldi
    TBA
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 5, 2014: TBA
    Frederic Vitart (ECMWF- Reading UK)
    TBA
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 11, 2014: A survey of Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (COREs)
    Stephen Griffies (GFDL)
    A survey of Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (COREs)
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 12, 2014: A Monsoonal link to the rapid Arctic ice melt
    T. N. Krishnamurti (Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida)
    This study provides a monsoonal link to the rapid Arctic ice melt. Each year the planetary scale African Asian monsoonal outflow near the tropopause carries a large anticyclonic gyre that has a longitudinal spread which occupies nearly half of the entire tropics. In recent years, the south Asian summer monsoon has experienced increased rainfall over the northwest of India and Pakistan and it has also contributed to more intense local anticyclonic outflows from this region. The western lobes of these intense upper high pressure areas carry outflows with large heat fluxes from the monsoon belt towards central Asia and eventually to the region of the rapid ice melt of the Canadian Arctic. In this study this spectacular pathway has been defined from air flow trajectories, heat content and heat flux anomalies. Most of these show slow increasing trends in the last 20 years. The monsoonal connection to the rapid Arctic ice melt is a new contribution of this study. This is shown from the passage of a vertical column of large positive values of the heat content anomaly that can be traced from the Asian monsoon belt to the Canadian Arctic. The heat flux along these episodic and intermittently active pathways is shown to be considerably larger than the atmospheric poleward flux across latitude circles and from the oceans.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 9, 2014: TBA
    Baylor Fox-Kemper (Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island)
    TBA
    Time: 8:30 am - 8:30 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 25, 2014: TBA
    Dave Thompson (CSU)
    TBA
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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