GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

Approaching storm iStockphoto.com/MvH

Welcome

The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) is engaged in comprehensive long lead-time research fundamental to NOAA’s mission. Scientists at GFDL develop and use mathematical models and computer simulations to improve our understanding and prediction of the behavior of the atmosphere, the oceans, and climate. GFDL scientists focus on model-building relevant for society, such as hurricane research, prediction, and seasonal forecasting, and understanding global and regional climate change.

Since 1955, GFDL has set the agenda for much of the world’s research on the modeling of global climate change and has played a significant role in the World Meteorological Organization, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessments, and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. GFDL’s mission is to be a world leader in the development of earth system models, and the production of timely and reliable knowledge and assessments on natural climate variability and anthropogenic changes.

GFDL research encompasses the predictability and sensitivity of global and regional climate; the structure, variability, dynamics and interaction of the atmosphere and the ocean; and the ways that the atmosphere and oceans influence, and are influenced by various trace constituents. The scientific work of the Laboratory incorporates a variety of disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, hydrology, classical physics, fluid dynamics, chemistry, applied mathematics, and numerical analysis.

Research is also facilitated by the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program (AOS), which is a collaborative program at GFDL with Princeton University. Under this program, Princeton faculty, research scientists, and graduate students participate in theoretical studies, both analytical and numerical, and in observational experiments in the laboratory and in the field. The program is supported in part by NOAA funding. AOS scientists may also be involved in GFDL research through institutional or international agreements.

For an overview of GFDL’s work, see our Fact Sheet.

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Research Highlights

Read more GFDL Research Highlights

Events & Seminars

  • December 9, 2016: Dynamic Preconditioning of the Minimum September Sea-ice Extent (abstract)
    James Williams (McGill University)
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 5, 2017: TBD (abstract)
    Formal Seminar
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 11, 2017: TBD (abstract)
    Alexis Burg (GFDL)
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 12, 2017: TBD (abstract)
    Adrian Jenkins (Cambridge, UK)
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 19, 2017: TBD (abstract)
    Formal Seminar
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 26, 2017: TBD (abstract)
    Formal Seminar
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • February 1, 2017: Winter 2017 GFDL Poster Expo (abstract)
    GFDL Poster Expo
    Time: 1:00 pm - 6:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • February 2, 2017: TBD (abstract)
    Formal Seminar
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • February 8, 2017: TBD (abstract)
    Levi Silvers (GFDL)
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • February 9, 2017: TBD (abstract)
    Erik van Sebille (Imperial College London)
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

More events & seminars...