GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

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Visualizations - Oceans

See also: Oceans and Climate group and Ocean Modeling

Large Scale Ocean Dynamics

Title Formation of melt channels on the base of the ice shelf. Shape shows the shape of the ice-shelf base, colors show the plume flux.  View from the grounding line towards ice front.
Description The movie shows results of simulations of a fully coupled ice-shelf-flow/sub-ice-shelf ocean circulation model. The ice shelf has no-slip conditions at the lateral boundaries. Frames are taken every 10 years.
Model name GFDL ice-shelf/sub-ice-shelf circulation model
Scientist(s) Olga Sergienko
Date created November 28, 2012
Visualization Personnel Olga Sergienko
Files Mov (6 MB)
Flash
HTML5 Video

Title The Impact of the Nordic Sea Overflow on Passive Tracers in the North Atlantic
Description In the control experiment using CM2.5, the Nordic Sea overflow entered into the North Atlantic deep ocean is very weak. The passive dye is released continuously from the Denmark Strait with a constant concentration of 1. Due to the lack of a strong deep current near the western boundary south of the Flemish Cap, the younger age tracer and the passive dye released from the Demark Strait are mainly confined to the subpolar region and do not penetrate to south of the Grand Banks. On the contrary, in the perturbed experiment, when a much stronger Nordic Sea overflow enters into the North Atlantic deep ocean through the Denmark Strait, the younger age tracer and the passive dye released from the Denmark Strait show much higher concentration near the western boundary and less eastward distribution in the interior ocean, and can reach the western North Atlantic basin south of the Grand Banks due to the advection by the stronger deep current.
Model name CM2.5
Scientist(s) Rong Zhang, Tom Delworth, Tony Rosati, Whit Anderson, Keith Dixon
Date created January, 2011
Visualization Personnel Simon Su
Files Mov (44 MB)
Flash
HTML5 Video

 

Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill


Title Dissolved oil plume from mixed layer source (decaying)
Description The simulated concentration (in parts per billion) of dissolved oil in the ocean mixed layer (near the sea surface). The simulated ocean currents used here are plausible but should not agree in detail with the observed currents. The source of oil is steady between April 20th and July 15th but the plume wavers back and forth with the changing ocean currents. The initial position of the loop current can affect the exact location of the dissolved oil plumes, but will not substantially alter the confinement of the significant concentrations to the Northern Gulf of Mexico, provided that the microbial oxidation is taken into account. 
Model name
Scientist(s) Alistair Adcroft
Robert Hallberg
Date created August 20, 2010
Visualization Personnel n/a
Files Mpg (3 MB)
HTML5 Video


Title
Dissolved oil plume from mixed layer source (non-decaying)
Description In contrast to the first animation, animation 2 shows what happens if microbial decay is omitted (as in some previous studies); the strong surface currents can spread the plume of dissolved oil throughout the Gulf of Mexico and as far as the Florida Straits and beyond. This extensive spreading of dissolved oil is not what has been observed and we do not believe that this animation is representative of actual events.
Model name
Scientist(s) Alistair Adcroft
Robert Hallberg
Date created August 20, 2010
Visualization personnel n/a
Files Mpg (11 MB)
HTML5 Video


Title
Oxygen draw-down due to the deep plume
Description The percentage draw down of dissolved oxygen for a 300 m thick deep plume (as a percentage of climatological levels at 1,000-1,300 m depth). The regions of significant oxygen depletion remain confined to the source region. If the actual plume were much thicker, both the hydrocarbon concentration and oxygen draw down would be proportionately smaller due to dilution.
Model name
Scientist(s) Alistair Adcroft
Robert Hallberg
Date created August 20, 2010
Visualization personnel n/a
Files Mpg (4.3 MB)
HTML5 Video

 

Ocean Surface Temperature

 

Title
Sea surface temperature simulation from 1/10o and 1o resolution ocean models coupled to the same 1/2o resolution atmosphere model.
Description
The animation shows the impact of ocean resolution on the simulation of ocean currents and eddies.
Model name CM2.6 and CM2.5FLOR
Scientist(s) Whit Anderson
Stephen Griffies
Michael Winton
Date created March 7, 2014
Visualization Personnel Whit Anderson
Files Flash
HTML5 Video
Mov (68 MB)

Sea surface temperature (SST) simulation from GFDL's high resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean model. As the animation focuses on various locations of the world ocean we see the major current systems eg. the Agulhas current, Brazil current, Gulf Stream, Pacific Equatorial current, Kuroshio current. The small scale eddy structure is resolved and evident.

Title Surface Speed
Description Sea surface temperature (SST) simulation from GFDL's high resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean model. As the animation focuses on various locations of the world ocean we see the major current systems eg. the Agulhas current, Brazil current, Gulf Stream, Pacific Equatorial current, Kuroshio current. The small scale eddy structure is resolved and evident.
Model name CM2.4
Scientist(s) Thomas Delworth
Anthony Rosati
Date created March, 2008
Visualization Personnel n/a
Files 1080p High-Def Avi (56 MB)
1080p High-Def Mpeg (123 MB)
1080p Lossless Mpeg (3.4 GB)
Png (768px×576px) (1.3 MB)
Png (4000px×3000px) (10.8 MB)
Flash
HTML5 Video
Mov (116 MB)
Mpg (61 MB)
Indian Ocean Flash
Indian Ocean Mov (67 MB)
Indian Ocean Wmv (72 MB)

The animation focuses on the Loop Current as it flows into the Gulf Stream (a major surface current). Note the black colors indicate the warmest ocean surface temperatures and and light blues indicate the coolest temperatures. Sea surface temperature (SST) simulation from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's (GFDL) high resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean model.

Title The Loop Current and the Gulf Stream
Description The animation focuses on the Loop Current as it flows into the Gulf Stream (a major surface current).
Model name CM2.4
Scientist(s) Anthony Rosati
Thomas Delworth
Date created n/a
Visualization Personnel Remik Ziemlinksi
Files MP4 (65 MB)
Animated GIF 
Flash
HTML5 Video

 

Ocean Surface Salinity

This is a simulation of the Arctic Ocean Surface Salinity from GFDL's high resolution coupled model. One can see the seasonal cycle of summertime freshening from sea ice melt as well as the salty water entering from the North Atlantic current.

Title Surface Salinity
Description This is a simulation of the Arctic Ocean Surface Salinity from GFDL's high resolution coupled model. One can see the seasonal cycle of summertime freshening from sea ice melt as well as the salty water entering from the North Atlantic current.
Model name CM2.4
Scientist(s) Thomas Delworth
Anthony Rosati
Date created March, 2008
Visualization Personnel n/a
Files Png (1.3 MB)
Mov (44 MB)
Mpg (30 MB)
Flash
HTML5 Video
Indian Ocean Mov (45 MB)
Indian Ocean Wmv (56 MB)
Indian Ocean Flash
Indian Ocean HTML5 Video

 

Ocean Surface Speed

A three-dimensional ocean circulation model has
been used for studying both the ocean climate
system and more idealized ocean circulations.

Title
Surface Speed
Description A three-dimensional ocean circulation model has been used for studying both the ocean climate system and more idealized ocean circulations.
Model name Hybrid Isopycnal Model
Scientist(s) R. Hallberg
Date created n/a
Visualization personnel n/a
Files Gif (679 KB)
Flc (63 MB)
Flash
HTML5 Video

The figure above shows us that southern ocean productivity may be linked with eddy activity.

Title
SeaWIFS Productivity vs. Surface Speed
Description The figure shows us that southern ocean productivity may be linked with eddy activity.
Model name Hybrid Isopycnal Model
Scientist(s) R. Hallberg
Date created n/a
Visualization personnel n/a
Files Png (18 KB)