GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

GFDL Events & Seminars

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars

  • February 22, 2017: Black Carbon-Snow-Radiation Interactions and Albedo Effects over the Tibetan Plateau
    Cenlin He (UCLA)
    Postdoc/visiting scientist lecture. Black carbon (BC), commonly known as soot, has been identified as the second most important anthropogenic emissions in terms of global climate forcing in the current atmosphere. Its regional warming effect can be even stronger over snow-covered areas due to BC-snow albedo effects. Observations have shown that BC deposition on snow is an important driver of rapid snow melting and glacier retreat over high mountains such as the Tibetan Plateau, which can further affect hydrological cycle and water availability. However, BC-snow-radiation interactions and associated albedo effects have not been thoroughly studied in such a manner as to understand, quantify, and reduce large uncertainties in the estimate of radiative and hydrological effects. Thus, this study seeks to improve our understanding and estimates of BC-snow albedo effect by developing a new snow model and BC-snow parameterizations for several important features in BC-snow-radiation-mountain interactions, including realistic snow grain shape, stochastic multiple aerosol-snow internal mixing, snow close packing, and 3-D radiative transfer over complex terrain, which have not been accounted for in previous studies. We particularly focus on the Tibetan Plateau regions. Additional efforts have also been given to investigate BC atmospheric aging, a key process representing hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion, which affects BC optical properties and deposition on snow and hence BC-snow albedo effects.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • February 23, 2017: Paleoclimate constraints on the spatio-temporal character of past and future drought in climate models
    Sloan Coats (University of Colorado)
    Drought is a spatio-temporal phenomenon; however, due to limitations of traditional statistical techniques it is often analyzed solely temporally—for instance, by taking the hydroclimate average over a spatial area to produce a timeseries. Herein, we use machine learning based Markov Random Field methods that identify drought in three-dimensional space-time. Critically, the joint space-time character of this technique allows both the temporal and spatial characteristics of drought to be analyzed. We apply these methods to climate model output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 and tree-ring based reconstructions of hydroclimate over the full Northern Hemisphere for the past 1000 years. Analyzing reconstructed and simulated drought in this context provides a paleoclimate constraint on the spatio-temporal character of past and future droughts, with some surprising and important insights into future drought projections. Climate models, for instance, suggest large increases in the severity and length of future droughts but little change in their width (latitudinal and longitudinal extent). These models, however, exhibit biases in the mean width of drought over large parts of the Northern Hemisphere, which may undermine their usefulness for future projections. Despite these limitations, and in contrast to previous high-profile claims, there are no fundamental differences in the spatio-temporal character of simulated and reconstructed drought during the historical interval (1850-present), with critical implications for our confidence in future projections derived from climate models.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • February 24, 2017: TBD
    Visiting Scientist
    TBD
    Time: 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 1, 2017: TBD
    Mingin Lee (GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 2, 2017: TBD
    William Collins (LBL and UC Berkeley)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 7, 2017: Carbon budgets aspects of the low warming climate targets
    Katarzyna Tokarska (University of Victoria)
    The cumulative emissions framework identifies a total amount of carbon that can be emitted, referred to as a carbon budget, compatible with stabilization of the global mean temperature at a desired level. Carbon budgets consistent with remaining below 1.5 °C global mean warming, reported in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5), are directly based on responses from comprehensive Earth System Models (CMIP5), which, on average, tend to warm more than observations for the current amount of carbon emitted. In this talk, I will present a screening approach of the available CMIP5 models, based on whether or not they simulate consistent fossil fuel emissions with those that have occurred for the observed level of present warming. The 1.5 °C carbon budgets based on the CMIP5 models which are consistent with observations show a higher median remaining amount of carbon that can be emitted than that inferred from the IPCC AR5. I will also address the effects of non-­‐CO2 greenhouse gases on carbon budgets. Using simulations from comprehensive Earth System Models, I will present a consistent approach of comparing carbon budgets compatible with not exceeding 1.5 °C and 2.0 °C warming due to CO2 alone, and in simulations that also include non-­‐CO2 forcings.
    Time: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 8, 2017: TBD
    Hiroyuki "Hiro" Murakami (GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 9, 2017: TBD
    Dargan Frierson (University of Washington)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 15, 2017: Cross-Time Scale Diagnostics of Coupled Circulation Models
    Angel Munoz (GFDL)
    Approaches to diagnose numerical circulation models generally involve metrics that provide an overall summary of the performance of the model in reproducing the particular variables of interest, normally tied to specific spatial and temporal scales. Nonetheless, the evaluation of the goodness of a model is not always linked to the understanding of physical processes that may be correctly represented, distorted or even ab- sent in the model universe. As physical mechanisms are frequently related to interactions at multiple temporal and spatial scales, cross-scale model diagnostic tools are not only desirable but required. This study proposes an integrated diagnostic framework based on weather type spatial patterns and frequencies of occurrence to facilitate the identification of model biases across multiple timescales. To illustrate the approach, three sets of 32-year-long simulations are analyzed for Northeastern North America and for the March-May season. The numerical experiments were produced by the LOAR and FLOR models, coupled Global Circulation Models developed by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) with 2-degree and 0.5-degree horizontal resolution in the atmosphere, respectively, and with nudging approaches designed to reproduce key aspects of the observed climate variability. It is found that both models exhibit a fair representation of the observed circulation regime’s spatial patterns and frequencies of occurrence, although some biases are present inde- pendently of the horizontal resolution of the models used. Overall, inter-experiment differences in the mean frequencies of occurrence of the simulated weather types, and their variability across multiple timescales, tend to be negligible. It is proposed that low-resolution models could be of potential use to diagnose and predict physical variables (e.g., rainfall and surface temperature), via their simulated weather type characteristics.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 16, 2017: TBD
    Oliver Wild (Lancaster University, UK)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 22, 2017: TBD
    Jie Hie
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 23, 2017: TBD
    Kpse[ {emie;as (University of Barcelona)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 29, 2017: The effect of buttressing on marine ice sheet dynamics
    Marianne Haseloff (GFDL/Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 30, 2017: TBD
    Anna Michalak (Carnegie Institute-Stanford, CA)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 5, 2017: Aerosol Microphysics
    Gingian Jin (MIT)
    sponsor: Paul Ginoux
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 6, 2017: TBD
    Kevin Bowman (NASA JPL)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 12, 2017: TBD
    Andrew Hazelton
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 13, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 20, 2017: TBD
    Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 27, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 2, 2017: GFDL Hurricane Science Symposium
    GFDL Hurricane Science Symposium
    GFDL Hurricane Science Symposium
    Time: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 4, 2017: TBD
    Rich Neale (NCAR)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 9, 2017: Hurricane Science Symposium
    Tim Marchok
    Hurricane Science Symposium
    Time: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 11, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 16, 2017: TBD
    Daniel Gilford (MIT)
    TBD
    Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 18, 2017: TBD
    Rob DeConto (University of Massachusetts)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 22, 2017: Anna Trugman - Final Public Oral
    Anna Trugman - Final Public Oral
    Anna Trugman - Final Public Oral
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 25, 2017: TBD
    Ning Lin (Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 1, 2017: TBD
    Nicholas Lutsko - FPO (Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 1, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 8, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 15, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 22, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 29, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 6, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 13, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 20, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 27, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 3, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 10, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 17, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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