GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

GFDL Events & Seminars

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars

  • September 28, 2016: Idealized atmospheric models and tropical cyclone climatology
    Isaac Held (GFDL)
    Starting with the realistically configured HiRAM model, a number of idealized models have been used to probe fundamental controls on tropical cyclone climatology. These include aquaplanets with realistic meridional temperature gradients, aquaplanets with uniform SSTs, and f-plane radiative-convective equilibria with fixed SSTs and with slab ocean boundary conditions. Five papers have been published on this work, led by graduate students and post-docs (Zhou, Ballinger, Merlis). I will try to place this series of papers in a broader context, emphasizing open questions.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 30, 2016: Todd Mooring FPO
    Todd Mooring FPO
    Todd Mooring FPO
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 4, 2016: Eddy mixing and transport at the Antarctic margins
    Andrew Stuart (UCLA)
    TBD
    Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 5, 2016: Impact of fine-scale physical processes on large-scale marine ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycling
    Xiao Liu (University of Southern California)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 6, 2016: Delta-MAPS: From spatio-temporal data to a weighted and lagged network between functional domains. A climate application
    Annalisa Bracco (Georgia Tech)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 11, 2016: TBD
    Sylvia Sullivan (Georgia Tech)
    TBD
    Time: 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Location: 217 Conference Room
  • October 12, 2016: CPMIP: Measurements of Real Computational Performance of Earth System Models
    V. Balaji (GFDL)
    Traditional metrics of computational efficiency such as performance counters and scaling curves do not tell us enough about real sustained performance from climate models on different machines. They also do not provide a satisfactory basis for comparative information across models. We introduce a set of metrics that can be used for the study of computational performance of climate (and Earth System) models. These measures do not require specialized software or specific hardware counters, and should be accessible to anyone. They are independent of platform, and underlying parallel programming models. We show how these metrics can be used to measure actually attained performance of Earth system models on different machines, and identify the most fruitful areas of research and development for performance engineering. We present results for these measures for a diverse suite of models from several modeling centres, and propose to use these measures as a basis for a CPMIP, a computational performance MIP.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 13, 2016: TBD
    Ming Xue (University of Oklahoma)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 17, 2016: Equatorial Waves and the Performance of the NCEP and ECMWF Operational forecast models during NOAAs 2016 El Nino Rapid Response Campaign
    George Kiladis
    The El Nino Rapid Response (ENRR) field campaign targeted equatorial Pacific atmospheric convective activity during January-March 2016 through enhanced observations. The 2015-16 El Nino had much in common with the events having similar amplitude sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies during 1982-83 and 1997-98, but also differed in several key aspects. All of these episodes featured enhanced convectively coupled Kelvin wave activity crossing the entire Pacific basin, while during December 2015 a large amplitude Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) was observed, with a convective signal that propagated unusually far to the east (~150W). A second MJO-like event occurred during the latter part of February, 2016, but despite similar SST and convective heating fields, the basic state flow was much different than during December, with strong upper level westerlies favoring the intrusion of extratropical Rossby wave energy into the equatorial eastern Pacific region. This second MJO event was accompanied by an unexpected lack of storm activity and associated precipitation along the west coast of North America. Based on the preliminary results of AMIP simulations using observed SSTs, these differences are hypothesized to be due to internal variability within the storm track itself that may have been overriding the large scale forcing by the tropical diabatic heating field. We assess the quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) skill of the NCEP GFS and ECMWF IFS forecasts during ENRR through a comparison with GPM satellite precipitation estimates for the same period. Results reveal that, in general, initial conditions were reasonably well estimated in both forecast systems, as indicated by relatively good QPF scores for the 6-12 hour forecasts. In the tropics, a previously well-documented overestimation of light precipitation develops almost immediately, being more prevalent in the GFS than the IFS. In general, extratropical Northern Hemisphere QPF in the GFS was superior to the IFS at all lags and for all sectors, but this was reversed in the tropics, with the IFS scoring somewhat better. Tests of the Grell-Freitas "scale aware" convective parameterization are shown to improve the performance of the GFS in the tropics at all forecast lead times.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 19, 2016: TBD
    Daniel Ward (GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 20, 2016: TBD
    Sergey Kravtsov (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 26, 2016: TBD
    Dan Feldman (Lawrence/Berkley Lab)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 1, 2016: TBD
    Bjorn Stevens (Max-Planck Institute - Hamburg Germany)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 9, 2016: TBD
    Mitch Bushuk (GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 16, 2016: TBD
    Brandon Reichl (GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • December 1, 2016: TBD
    Isla Simpson (NCAR)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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