GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

GFDL Events & Seminars

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars

  • April 25, 2018: A more complete view of radiative forcing and feedback
    Lunchtime Seminar Series - Yi Huang (McGill University, Montreal, CA)
    Climate forcing and feedback are usually analyzed at the top of atmosphere or troposphere. In this talk I will discuss the radiative forcing and feedback also concerning the surface and atmospheric energy budgets. This analysis is enabled by a new set of surface and TOA radiation kernels that we developed. A few results will be discussed: 1)Changes in poleward energy transports in the atmosphere and ocean, which we find are both driven by the non-uniform distribution pattern of the CO2 radiative forcing and for which the TOA only perspective is misleading for some feedbacks; 2) ENSO, where we notice a positive feedback of cloud via atmospheric radiation that strongly influences the ENSO amplitude; and 3) Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice, the connection of which to surface radiative forcing and feedback is analyzed.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 2, 2018: ESSPE: Ensemble-based Simultaneous State and Parameter Estimation for Earth System Data-Model Integration and Uncertainty Quantification
    Fuqing Zhang (Penn State)
    Building on advanced data assimilation techniques, we advocate to develop and apply a generalized data assimilation software framework on Ensemble-based Simultaneous State and Parameter Estimation (ESSPE) that will facilitate data-model integration and uncertainty quantification for the broad earth and environmental science communities. This include, but not limited to, atmospheric composition and chemistry, land surface, hydrology, and biogeochemistry, for which many of the physical and chemical processes in their respective dynamic system models rely heavily on parameterizations. Through augmenting uncertain model parameters as part of the state vector, the ESSPE framework will allow for simultaneous state and parameter estimation through assimilating in-situ measurements such as those from the CZO networks and/or remotely sensed observations such as those from radars and satellites. Beyond data model integration and uncertainty quantification, through systematically designed ensemble sensitivity analysis, examples will be given to the application of the ESSPE framework to: (1) identify key physical processes and their significance/impacts and to better represent and parameterize these processes in dynamical models of various earth systems; (2) design better observation strategies in locating the optimum sensitive regions, periods and variables to be measured, and the minimum accuracies and frequencies of these measurements that are required to quantify the physical processes of interest; explore the impacts of heterogeneity and equifinality; (3) understand predictability and nonlinearity of these processes, and parameter identifiability; and (4) facilitate upscale cascading of knowledge from smaller-scale process understanding to larger-scale simplified representation and parameterization.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 16, 2018: Observational Constraints on Climate, Carbon, and Water processes and feedbacks
    Lunchtime Seminar Series - John Worden (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
    Feedbacks between the components of the Earth system will likely determine the future distribution of surface temperatures, water availability, and sea-level. However, testing our understanding of these Earth system processes and feedbacks is challenging due to their complexity, heterogeneous behavior across ecosystems, and range of spatial scales. Here we use decadal-scale records of CO2, CH4, CO fluxes (and their isotopes), and the isotopic composition of water derived from OCO-2, TES, MOPITT, GOSAT, and AIRS, along with aircraft and surface measurements to evaluate how climate perturbation and land-use affect tropical ecosystems and in turn the molar fraction of CO2, CH4, CO and H2O and rainfall. We infer a positive feedback between temperature, ecosystems, atmospheric CO2 and rainfall but possibly a negative feedback between temperature and atmospheric CH4. Strikingly, these different processes vary across the tropics with GPP, respiration, fires, and possibly methanogenisis all showing different variations across the tropics in response to temperature and precipitation variations. These processes are also likely occurring at very small spatial scales relative to the size of their corresponding ecosystems showing the need for combining remote sensing with in situ data for constraining knowledge of these feedbacks.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 23, 2018: The Global Data Infrastructure for CMIP6
    Lunchtime Seminar - Balaji Venkatramani
    We present recommendations for the global data infrastructure needed to support CMIP scientific design, and its future growth and evolution. We follow a dataset-centric design less prone to systemic failure. Scientific publication in the digital age is evolving to make data a primary scientific output, alongside the traditional peer-reviewed literature. We design toward that future scientific data ecosystem, informed by the need for reproducibility, provenance capture, future data technologies, and measures of costs and benefits.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 27, 2018: SPEAR - The Next Generation Seasonal to Decadal Prediction System at GFDL
    Lunchtime Seminar Series - Tom Delworth
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    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 16, 2018: AOS Workshop
    AOS Workshop
    AOS Workshop POC: Anna Valerio
    Time: All Day
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 26, 2018: Lunchtime Seminar
    Lunchtime Seminar
    Lunchtime Seminar
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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