GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

GFDL Events & Seminars

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars

  • July 24, 2017: Impact of ocean submesoscale turbulence on global climate
    Dr. Zhan Su (Climate Processes and Sensitivity Group)
    For the first time, we explicitly resolve ocean turbulence down to ~5km on a global scale using a new high-resolution global model (1/48º horizontally). Results highlight strong submesoscale turbulence (defined here as scales ≲50km) in most mid and high latitude oceans. These submesoscale structures are found to cause strong upward heat fluxes up to ~1000 W/m2 in the upper ocean. Our results show that submesoscale processes are critical to setting the rate, timing and location of heat exchange between the interior ocean, the surface ocean, and the atmosphere, and are therefore a key component of the global heat budget. Furthermore, submesoscale dynamics is found to provide a significant kinetic energy source that powers the global large-scale ocean circulation. Dr. Zhan Su, California Institute of Technology. POC at GFDL is Stephen Griffies, 609-452-6672.
    Time: 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 25, 2017: The Influence of Aerosol Emissions Geographic Location on the Magnitude and Spatial Distribution of Climate Effects
    Geeta Persad (Carnegie Institution)
    The global distribution of anthropogenic aerosol emissions has evolved continuously since the preindustrial era – from 20th century North American and Western European emissions hotspots to present-day South and East Asian ones. With this comes a relocation of the regional radiative, dynamical, and hydrological impacts of aerosol emissions, which may influence global climate differently depending on where they occur. A lack of understanding of this relationship between aerosol emissions’ location and their global climate effects, however, obscures the potential influence that aerosols’ evolving geographic distribution may have on global and regional climate change—a gap which we address in this work. Using a novel suite of experiments in the CESM CAM5 atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean, we systematically test and analyze mechanisms behind the relative climate impact of identical black carbon and sulfate aerosol emissions located in each of 8 past, present, or projected future major emissions regions. Results indicate that historically high emissions regions, such as North America and Western Europe, produce a stronger cooling effect than current and projected future high emissions regions. Aerosol emissions located in Western Europe produce 3 times the global mean cooling (-0.34 °C) as those located in East Africa or India (-0.11 °C). The aerosols’ in-situ radiative effects remain relatively confined near the emissions region, but large distal cooling results from remote feedback processes – such as ice albedo and cloud changes – that are excited more strongly by emissions from certain regions than others. Results suggest that aerosol emissions from different countries should not be considered equal in the context of climate mitigation accounting, and that the evolving geographic distribution of aerosol emissions may have a substantial impact on the magnitude and spatial distribution of global climate change. POC at GFDL is Yi Ming, 609-452-5338.
    Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 25, 2017: Examining the impact of temperature on shipping days for corn, soy beans and wheat
    Haylie Mikulak, Manon Vignes, Bridgette Befort
    30 minute Intern Presentations - HAYLIE MIKULAK: Examining the impact of temperature on shipping days for corn, soy beans and wheat. MANON VIGNES: HiFLOR model projections of North Atlantic tropical cyclone activity under late 21st century warming conditions. BRIDGETTE BEFORT: Evaluation of intra-seasonal variability of the Asian Monsoon in GFDL's latest climate model.
    Time: 3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 25, 2017: HiFLOR model projections of North Atlantic tropical cyclone activity under late 21st century warming conditions
    Manon Vignes
    30 minute Intern Presentations
    Time: 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 25, 2017: Evaluation of intra-seasonal variability of the Asian Monsoon in GFDL's latest climate model
    Bridgette Befort
    30 minute Intern Presentation
    Time: 4:00 pm - 4:30 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 27, 2017: Climate Sensitivity
    Andy Dessler (Texas A&M)
    .
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
    Location: 217 Conference Room
  • July 28, 2017: Model based evaluation of bubble injection in air-sea gas exchange parameterizations
    Rebecca Barber, Elise Penn, Katie Boaggio, Hannah Tandy
    30 minute Intern Presentation - REBECCA BARBER: Model based evaluation of bubble injection in air-sea gas exchange parameterizations. ELISE PENN: Evaluation of GFDL-AM4 simulations of nitrogen oxides with OMI satellite observations. KATIE BOAGGIO: Tracking and analyzing extratropical cyclones with fvGFS. HANNAH TANDY: ESM2Mb sensitivities to Paleoclimate forcings of the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum.
    Time: 10:00 am - 10:30 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 28, 2017: Evaluation of GFDL-AM4 simulations of nitrogen oxides with OMI satellite observations
    Elise Penn
    30 minute Intern Presentations
    Time: 10:30 am - 11:00 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 28, 2017: Tracking and analyzing extratropical cyclones with fvGFS
    Katie Boaggio
    30 minute Intern Presentations
    Time: 11:00 am - 11:30 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 28, 2017: ESM2Mb sensitivities to Paleoclimate forcings of the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maxium
    Hannah Tandy
    30 minute Intern Presentations
    Time: 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 3, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 4, 2017: Intern Presentation
    Intern Presentation
    Intern Presentation
    Time: 10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 9, 2017: TBD
    Jordan Schnell (GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 10, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 11, 2017: Intern Presentation
    Intern Presentation (GFDL)
    Intern Presentation
    Time: 10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 16, 2017: Balancing Drag Parameterizations in Atmospheric Models:Illustrations with the Kim Drag Parameterization Suite
    Young-Jeon Kim
    This talk will first describe a suite of drag parameterization schemes I developed for atmospheric models. The suite includes an orographic gravity-wave drag parameterization scheme (Kim and Arakawa 1995), a blocked-layer drag parameterization scheme (Kim and Doyle 2005), and a convective gravity-wave drag parameterization scheme (Kim and Chun 2005). In order to seamlessly and efficiently cover also the middle/upper atmosphere including over the ocean, a spectral gravity-wave drag parameterization scheme by Alexander and Dunkerton (1999) is tightly coupled to the aforementioned lower/middle atmospheric schemes. In order to correctly represent the effects of drag due to orography and convective sources (and other sources such as jets, fronts) in atmospheric models, the balance or harmony among the different components of drag parameterization schemes is crucial as well as their individual contributions. The balance between the upper and lower atmosphere is also important. The balance should be extended to other drag-related physics of the model, and further to observation data ingested through data assimilation. An imbalance in this regard will have a larger negative impact on weather and climate prediction and simulation with higher model top and resolutions. Some examples along this line with the Kim drag parameterization schemes will be presented. If time permits, a new branch recently created within the NWS HQs, the Analysis and Nowcast Branch, will be briefly introduced. Young-Jeon "YJ" Kim Chief, Analysis and Nowcast Branch Analysis and Mission Support Division Analyze, Forecast, and Support Office NOAA/National Weather Service Silver Spring, MD 20910 - POC at GFDL is Shian-Jiann Lin, (609) 452-6514.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 17, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 23, 2017: Modeling the impacts of climate variability and change on Chesapeake and Delaware Bays
    Andrew Ross (Penn State)
    In this talk, I discuss two key questions on the use of numerical models to understand the impacts of climate variability and change on the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays and other estuarine ecosystems. First, are numerical ocean models capable of accurately simulating the effects of climate change that have already been observed? Using model simulations of changes in tides in response to past sea-level rise, I show that the model successfully reproduced some of the observed sensitivity of tidal amplitudes to mean sea level. Notably, sea-level rise produces a shifting of the amphidromic system in the Chesapeake Bay and increased amplification of the tides in the Delaware Bay. Second, how can we use numerical models to simulate the effects of uncertain future climate change? Top-down strategies are often employed, which involve a computationally expensive chain of models to translate global climate change into local impacts. However, to reduce the computational costs, modelers often must restrict their simulations to use boundary conditions from only a few emissions scenarios and global climate models. My work examines how to optimally select a limited number of boundary condition models using a test case of simulating runoff in the Susquehanna River Basin. I show that only one model selection strategy was satisfactory. However, regardless of the selection strategy used, simulations with only a few model scenarios neglected a large range of actual uncertainty. Therefore, complex numerical models may be better used in idealized sensitivity experiments or as compliments to other modeling approaches. POC at GFDL is Charles Stock, 609-452-5331.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 24, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 28, 2017: Climate Engineering
    Climate Engineering
    Climate Engineering
    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 29, 2017: Climate Engineering
    Climate Engineering
    Climate Engineering
    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 30, 2017: Climate Engineering
    Climate Engineering
    Climate Engineering
    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 31, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 6, 2017: Sahel rainfall response to a uniform oceanic warming
    Yi Ming (GFDL)
    Coupled climate models project future changes to rainfall in the African Sahel ranging from severe drying to severe wettening. Atmosphere-only models perturbed with uniform ocean surface warming span a similar range, motivating study of the simpler latter problem in order to constrain the more societally relevant former one. We analyze four comprehensive atmospheric models developed at the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, which respond to uniform ocean surface warming of 2 K with Sahel wet season rainfall changes ranging from -38 to +15%. A detailed MSE budget analysis reveals the relative importance of different processes in determining the response.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 7, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 13, 2017: TBD
    Lorenzo Polvani (Columbia University)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 14, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 20, 2017: TBA
    Yohai Kaspi
    Yohai Kaspi Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 21, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 27, 2017: TBD
    Luc Deike (Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 28, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 4, 2017: Moisture-convection feedbacks and a precipitation equation for the Madden-Julian Oscillation
    Angel Adames (GFDL)
    Column moisture and moist static energy (MSE) budgets have become common tools in the study of the processes responsible for the maintenance and evolution of the MJO. While many studies have shown that precipitation is spatially correlated with column moisture, these budgets do not directly describe the MJO-related precipitation anomalies. Other spatially varying fields may also play a role in determining the horizontal distribution of anomalous precipitation. In this study, an empirical precipitation anomaly field is derived that depends on three variables in addition to column moisture. These are the low-frequency distribution of precipitation, the low-frequency column saturation water vapor, and the sensitivity of precipitation to changes in column relative humidity. The addition of these fields improve upon moisture/MSE budgets by confining these anomalies to the climatologically rainy areas of the tropics, where MJO activity is strongest. The derived field adequately describes the MJO-related precipitation anomalies, comparing favorably with TRMM precipitation data.
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 5, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 11, 2017: TBD
    Pu Lin
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 12, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 19, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 25, 2017: TBD
    Hyeyum Hailey Shin (GFDL)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • October 26, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 2, 2017: GFDL Fall Symposium
    GFDL Fall Symposium
    GFDL Fall Symposium
    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 9, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 16, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 23, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • November 30, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • December 7, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • December 14, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • December 21, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • December 28, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 4, 2018: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 11, 2018: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • January 18, 2018: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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