GFDL - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

GFDL Events & Seminars

Upcoming GFDL events & seminars

Events and seminars

  • March 29, 2017: The record of Pacific Warm Pool climate change from stalagmites in Borneo
    Jess Adkins (California Technical Institute)
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    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • March 30, 2017: Moving from quantity to quality: Exploring climate impacts on inland and coastal waters
    Anna Michalak (Carnegie Institute-Stanford, CA)
    Questions surrounding water sustainability are most commonly framed in terms of quantity, whether too much or too little. The same is true for discussions of climate change and extreme events. Water is useful (usable) only if it is of sufficient quality for its intended use, however, whether directly by humans or by the broader ecosystem. The last two years alone have provided a host of compelling examples, with unprecedented harmful algal blooms developing along the West coast, in Utah Lake, in Lake Erie, and off the Florida coast. Several factors explain the lack of understanding of climate impacts on water quality impairments, including the relative complexity of underlying processes, the spatial and temporal scale mismatch between hydrologists and climatologists, and the difficulty in assessing historical conditions. The need to understand linkages is clear, however. Focusing on eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and hypoxic dead zones, this talk will frame challenges and opportunities related to characterizing water quality, bridging from local to global scales, identifying key drivers, and understanding the role of climate. Specific examples will include the development of statistical tools for mapping hypoxia, remote-sensing algorithms for tracking phytoplankton blooms, and empirical approaches for identifying common drivers of eutrophication across landscapes. In each case, the availability of these new tools makes it possible to develop and test novel hypotheses about the role of climate and what the future may hold.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 5, 2017: Aerosol Microphysics
    Gingian Jin (MIT)
    sponsor: Paul Ginoux
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 6, 2017: The potential of satellites and assimilation to quantify climate forcing, feedbacks, and prediction in the Earth System: application to atmospheric chemistry and the carbon cycle
    Kevin Bowman (NASA JPL)
    Anthropogenic activities since the industrial revolution have led to profound changes in atmospheric composition (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane and tropospheric ozone) and consequently the trajectory of our climate. However, the coupling of these constituents must be quantified in order to assess the efficacy of climate mitigation strategies against the backdrop of natural variability and climate feedbacks. The last decade has witnessed the launch of satellite constellations that measure Earth’s atmosphere, land, and oceans with a concomitant advance in data assimilation approaches to link these data to Earth System processes. Using these approaches, we have attributed ozone and methane radiative forcing to global emissions at large urban scales. By incorporating both methane emissions and chemical losses, we show that the top 10% of locations with positive net methane RF are responsible for 50% of the global positive RF and the top 10% of locations with negative RF cause 60% of the global negative RF based upon an RCP 6.0 trajectory through 2050. To understand the role of the carbon cycle in controlling the most important greenhouse gas, the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Flux (CMS-Flux) project was initiated as a coordinated effort between land surface, ocean, fossil fuel, and atmospheric scientists to develop a comprehensive a carbon cycle data assimilation system. Based upon this system, we attribute the historic atmospheric CO2 growth rate during the 2015 El Nino to spatially-resolved fluxes. We show how tropical productivity and respiration processes related to anomalously high climate variability, i.e., “extreme” events, are responsible for this growth rate and their implications for carbon-climate feedbacks. Emergent constraints have been become an active area of research that use contemporary observations to constrain climate projections. We have developed a Bayesian formulation of this approach that explicitly accounts for the uncertainty in observations and the uncertainty between the future and present state. We explore the potential of this framework for tropospheric ozone radiative forcing and the carbon cycle. Taken together, these advances in observations, modeling, and the methodologies to link them point to a scientifically rigorous and policy-relevant framework critically needed for the international community to address climate change. Dr. Kevin Bowman is the Principal Investigator of the EOS Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and the NASA Carbon Monitoring System (CMS-Flux) project. He received a BEE from Auburn University in 1991, a Diplôme de Spécialisation en Traitement et Transmission des Informations at L'Ecole Supérieure d'Electricité (SUPELEC), Metz, FRANCE in 1993, and a Phd in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1996. He subsequently continued his career at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1997. His research is centered on understanding the processes controlling atmospheric composition and their impact on climate using satellite observations, modeling, and data assimilation techniques. Dr. Bowman's broad interests have led to publications in diverse fields including air quality, carbon cycle, chemistry-climate, atmospheric hydrology, and remote sensing science. An avid musician and guitarist, Dr. Bowman is a founding member of the JPL Jazz Propulsion Band.
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 12, 2017: TBD
    Andrew Hazelton
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 13, 2017: TBD
    Yasuko Yoshida (NASA Goddard/IIASA Vienna Austria)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 20, 2017: TBD
    Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 26, 2017: Offline Tracer Modelling in MOM6
    Andrew Shao
    Offline Tracer Modelling in MOM6
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • April 27, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 2, 2017: GFDL Hurricane Science Symposium
    GFDL Hurricane Science Symposium
    GFDL Hurricane Science Symposium. For more information, see https://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/gfdl-hurricane-science-symposium/
    Time: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 3, 2017: Circulation and mixing in deep arctic ocean
    Hayley Dosser
    Circulation and mixing in deep arctic ocean
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 4, 2017: TBD
    Rich Neale (NCAR)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 10, 2017: The effect of buttressing on marine ice sheet dynamics
    Marianne Haseloff (GFDL/Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 16, 2017: TBD
    Daniel Gilford (MIT)
    TBD
    Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 17, 2017: Precipitation Budget of the MJO
    Angel Adames
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 18, 2017: TBD
    Rob DeConto (University of Massachusetts)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 22, 2017: Anna Trugman - Final Public Oral
    Anna Trugman - Final Public Oral
    Anna Trugman - Final Public Oral
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 25, 2017: TBD
    Ning Lin (Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • May 31, 2017: Predicting and characterizing atmospheric states from local dynamical properties of the underlying attractor
    Davide Faranda (Laboratorie des Sciences du Climate (LSCE) of the University of Paris-Saclay)
    Mid-latitude flows are characterized by a chaotic dynamics and recurring patterns hinting to the existence of an atmospheric attractor. In 1963 Lorenz described this object as: “the collection of all states that the system can assume or approach again and again, as opposed to those that it will ultimately avoid" and analyzed a low dimensional system describing a convective dynamics whose attractor has the shape of a butterfly. Since then, many studies try to find equivalent of the Lorenz butterfly in the complex atmospheric dynamics. Most of the studies where focused to determine the average dimension D of the attractor i.e. the number of degrees of freedom sufficient to describe the atmospheric circulation. However, obtaining reliable estimates of D has proved challenging. Moreover, D does not provide information on transient atmospheric motions, such as those leading to weather extremes. Using recent developments in dynamical systems theory, we show that such motions can be classified through instantaneous rather than average properties of the attractor. The instantaneous properties are uniquely determined by instantaneous dimension and stability. Their extreme values correspond to specific atmospheric patterns, and match extreme weather occurrences. We further show the existence of a significant correlation between the time series of instantaneous stability and dimension and the mean spread of sea-level pressure fields in an operational ensemble weather forecast at lead times of over two weeks. Instantaneous properties of the attractor therefore provide an efficient way of evaluating and informing operational weather forecasts
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 1, 2017: TBD
    Nicholas Lutsko - FPO (Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 1, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 8, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 9, 2017: Hold for Speaker for Griffies
    Hold for Speaker for Griffies
    Hold for Speaker for Griffies
    Time: 10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 14, 2017: TBD
    Bing Pu (Princeton University)
    TBD
    Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 15, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 22, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • June 29, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 6, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 13, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 20, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • July 27, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 3, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 10, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 17, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 24, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 28, 2017: Held Symposium
    Held Symposium
    Held Symposium
    Time: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 29, 2017: Held Symposium
    Held Symposium
    Held Symposium
    Time: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 30, 2017: Held Symposium
    Held Symposium
    Held Symposium
    Time: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • August 31, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 7, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 14, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room
  • September 21, 2017: TBD
    Formal Seminar
    TBD
    Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

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