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GFDL Events & Seminars

Visitors without GFDL affiliation attending seminars or other organized events must present government or university issued photo ID or two other forms of identification to gain access to the facility. If an acceptable ID cannot be provided, the Visitor will not be allowed access. If access is granted, the Visitor must sign in and be given a Visitor Badge. The Visitor Badge expires immediately after the seminar.

May 14, 2020

calendar_today Formal Seminar - Sonia Senevirante

person Formal Seminar (approved) - Formal Seminar - Sonia Senevirante (ETH, Zurich Switzerland)

access_time 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

speaker email: sonia.seneviratne@ethz.ch

May 20, 2020

calendar_today TBD

person Lunchtime Seminar - Lunchtime Seminar Series - Yuan Yu Xie (Princeton/GFDL)

access_time 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

To Be Announced.

May 21, 2020

calendar_today Formal Seminar - William Boos

person Formal Seminar (approved) - Formal Seminar - William Boos (University of California - Berkeley)

access_time 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

speaker email: william.boos@berkeley.edu

June 4, 2020

calendar_today Formal Seminar - Susan Wijffels

person Formal Seminar (approved) - Formal Seminar - Susan Wijffels (Woods Hole)

access_time 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

speaker email: swijffels@whoi.edu

June 11, 2020

calendar_today TBD

person Formal Seminar (approved) - Formal Seminar - Omar Ghattas (University of Texas, at Austin)

access_time 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

Formal Seminar - TBA omar@ices.utexas.edu HOST: V. Balaji or Olga Sergienko

June 18, 2020

calendar_today Weather & Forecasting Research Programs at the National Severe Storms Laboratory

person Formal Seminar (approved) - Formal Seminar - Pamela Heinselman (NOAA/NSSL)

access_time 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

The National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) serves to enhance NOAA's capabilities to provide accurate and timely forecasts and warnings of hazardous weather events. NSSL accomplishes this mission through: 1) research to advance the understanding of weather processes, 2) research to improve forecasting and warning techniques, and 3) development and transition of operational applications. NSSL transfers new scientific understanding, techniques, and applications to the National Weather Service (NWS). This presentation overviews the four divisions and primary programs at NSSL conducting basic and applied research in support of this mission. NSSL is NOAA's primary weather radar laboratory with strong scientific and engineering leadership in dual-polarization and phased array weather radar. Scientists and engineers within the Radar Research and Development Division (RRDD) are the primary research to operations (R2O) entity for the NEXRAD radar network. RRDD developed the dual-polarization weather radar prototype and used it to demonstrate improvements to quantitative precipitation estimation that led to the upgrade the NEXRAD network. This group is leading NOAA's research and development activities for a future operational radar network based on phased array radar technology. Weather radar data collected by the NEXRAD network, and other operational observation platforms, are the basis for severe weather applications developed by the Warning Research and Development Division (WRDD). A primary example is their development of the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) algorithm. Transitioned recently to National Weather Service (NWS) operations, this algorithm is foundational to the development of forecast tools, such as quantitative precipitation estimation and flash flood forecasting via FLASH (Flooded Locations and Simulated Hydrographs). Additionally, WRDD is leading the Forecasting a Continuum of Environmental Threats Program at NSSL through the development and testing of observational-driven 0-1-hour probabilistic hazard information in the Hazardous Weather Testbed, and social science research to ensure usability of probabilistic information by users, partners, and publics. While WRDD focuses on the warning spatiotemporal scale, the Forecast Research and Development Division (FRDD) focuses on a broader spatiotemporal continuum, from 1-hr to sub-seasonal forecasting. Primary research activities in FRDD include process studies of convective storms and environments, ground-based instrument development and observational strategies, and the development of severe weather climatology and long-term forecasting methods. FRDD also contains two programs key to NOAA's convective- and storm-scale modeling research, development, and evaluation: the Hazardous Weather Testbed Experimental Forecast Program (co-led with the NWS Storm Prediction Center) and the Warn-on-Forecast Program. The presentation will focus primarily on research and development conducted by FRDD scientists. In support of these three divisions, the Field Observing Facilities and Support team develops, maintains, and supports unique mobile instrumentation like Collaborative Lower Atmosphere Mobile Profiling System (CLAMPS), Mobile Laboratories, Electric Field Meters, Particle-size Image and Velocity Probe (PASIV), and mobile weather radars. NSSL scientists and engineers use this instrumentation to conduct in-house research and collaborative field programs, like VORTEX SE and Targeting Observations by Radars and UAS of Supercells (TORUS), to improve the understanding of severe storm processes. Speaker email: pam.heinselman@noaa.gov

June 22, 2020

calendar_today Diathermal ocean heat transport and numerical mixing in MOM5 and ACCESS-OM2

person Informal Seminar - Dr. Ryan Holmes (New South Wales, Sydney Australia)

access_time 10:30 am - 11:30 am

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

The ocean transports vast amounts of heat around the planet, helping to regulate regional climate. In this talk I will discuss a framework that relates the ocean's meridional heat transport to the diabatic processes of air-sea heat fluxes and mixing that move heat across temperature classes (i.e. the ocean's diathermal heat transport). Applied to global MOM5 and ACCESS-OM2 simulations the framework emphasizes the role of surface heat gain and mixing in the eastern tropical Pacific and the exchange of heat between the Indo-Pacific and Atlantic basins. Turbulent mixing (both explicitly parameterized and numerical) plays a key role by moving heat from the warm, shallow Indo-Pacific circulation to the deeper-reaching Atlantic circulation and to the cold isotherms that outcrop in the North Atlantic. I will also discuss the use of the framework for estimating numerical mixing in realistic global model simulations as well as its sensitivity to resolution and explicit physics parameterizations.

June 24, 2020

calendar_today TBD

person Lunchtime Seminar - Lunchtime Seminar Series - Pierre Gentine (Columbia University- Dept of Earth and Environmental Engineering)

access_time 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

To Be Announced.

June 25, 2020

calendar_today Formal Seminar - Trude Storelvmo

person Formal Seminar (approved) - Formal Seminar - Trude Storelvmo (University of Oslo)

access_time 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

place Location: Smagorinsky Seminar Room

speaker email: trude.storelvmo@geo.uio.no